Resources

The This Is Public Health campaign can be implemented at high school, college, and graduate school campus’. As well, community health centers, health departments, and individuals can use these resources to promote public health locally, nationally and globally. What Is Public Health? This video helps answer the question.

Below is a list of different examples of how you can use the This is Public Health campaign to engage your community. Many of these efforts were implemented by public health students during National Public Health Week.

  • Photo Essay Contest: Have people tell a story about public health through pictures. Everything they take a picture of has to have a This is Public Health sticker placed on it.
  • Scavenger Hunt: Use the stickers to mark certain checkpoints used in a community wide public health-themed Amazing Race- type contest or scavenger hunt.
  • Collage/Mural: Ask local schools to create collages or murals inspired by the This is Public Health stickers and what public health means to them.
  • Social Media: Take photos of public health efforts, issues, or events and share your photos on social media by using #thisispublichealth, and by tagging This is Public Health Facebook or Instagram accounts.
  • Stickering: Encourage elementary,high school, or college health classes to participate. Following a session on Public Health (perhaps integrating the This is Public Health video), have the students sticker their schools and/or communities, take photos and share them on social media. Example: Pick an important public health issue facing your community and cover a public representation of this issue through the placement of the stickers. (e.g. covering a water fountain in stickers if the water sanitation is a key issue.)

 

The This is Public Health campaign highlights how public health touches our daily lives.

The This is Public Health campaign educates residents of our community about the important role public health plays in protecting their lives and well being. From ‘No Smoking’ signs to immunization clinics, from water filtration plants to bike paths, public health is all around us – protecting our health by safeguarding the places where we live, work, and play.

Public health is your health.

Public health improves the conditions and behaviors that affect the health of each and every one of us. Public health battles against deadly contagious diseases and promotes healthier lifestyles. Public health seeks to reduce incidences of preventable diseases, minimize the consequences of catastrophic events, and provide the basics of sanitation, safe food, and water.

You are only as healthy as the world you live in.

Your health is determined not only by your own genetics and personal choices, but also by the environment around you. Public health investigates the ecology of health – from social networks and economic circumstances to our environment – and then minimizes health risks.

The globalization of health links us all.

The frenetic movement of food and people across borders permits illnesses to move rapidly from a remote village to far-away cities. Poor sanitation and a lack of health resources encourage new diseases, and can ultimately affect the health of Americans.

We have a significant shortage of public health workers.

We will need more than 250,000 public health workers by 2020 to meet the world’s healthcare needs – a challenge that is compounded by the impending retirement of nearly one-fourth of the current public health workforce. This crisis affects us all and will only escalate if we don’t act now.

Why is public health important?
Your health is determined not only by your own genetics and personal choices, but also by the environment around you. We all strive to live long, healthy lives and where we live, work and play affects our health. If you care about your health, the length and quality of your life, and the health and lives of your friends and family, then you should care about public health and the one week out of the year dedicated to bettering the lives of you and your surroundings.

How does public health save lives?
Public health combats threats to health by implementing educational programs, developing policies, administering services, and conducting research. Over the last century, public health has led to increased life expectancies, world-wide reduction in infant and child mortality, and the elimination or reduction of many communicable diseases.

What are the top public health issues today?
There are many public health issues that may be of interest to your audiences. Please see our page on this topic for some examples: http://www.aspph.org/discover/. If you have others you would like to see us add, please send your ideas to info@thisispublichealth.org.

How does the world around us affect our health?
The spread of disease or the quality of air and water are some of the more obvious ways in which the world around us affects our health. While your own genetics and personal choices are primary determinants of your health, the environment in which you live is another determinant. The task of public health is to investigate how the ecology of health affects our well-being, from social networks and economic circumstances to our environment, and then minimize health risks and promote better health for all of us.

How does globalization affect our health?
The frenetic movement of food and people across borders permits illnesses to move rapidly from a remote village to far away cities. Poor sanitation and a lack of health resources engender new diseases that can ultimately threaten the health of Americans. The globalization of health links us all more closely than ever before.

Why should government support public health?
Investing in public health helps everyone, and the failure to invest puts us all at risk. The current budget shortfall and lack of well-trained public health professionals exposes America to increased risk from threats such as mutating infectious diseases, potential bioterrorist attacks, natural disasters and preventable diseases. We need to support our public health infrastructure if we want to keep America healthy. More practically, it is an effective way to control soaring health care costs.